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Coal Reconciliation (Open-cut Mine Surveying Duties)

The reconciliation process involves determining how much coal has been mined. It allows the company to determine whether the amount of coal being delivered matches the amount of coal coming out of the pits, as well as allowing various geological tasks to be completed. Volume surveys in mining are conducted for various stakeholders, and allows companies to determine if they are making money effectively and to conduct scheduling tasks to ensure efficient operations.

When dealing with coal, surveys are required to survey the 'roof' and 'floor' of the coal. This refers to the top of the coal when uncovered, and the bottom of the coal once removed. This process allows for accurate records to be kept of what coal has been mined and what reserves remain.

Example #1: Coal Roof and Floor


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The above example shows the type of data obtained from surveying coal roof and floor. The blue represent roof and red represents floor. The point data is most easily surveyed using GPS, while the outer limits are usually derived from laser data. When coal is excavated to a high wall it makes it easy to collect data for a high wall coal limit.

Example #2: Roof data only


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Example #3: Floor data only


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Example #4: Roof and floor surfaces


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The surfaces shown above allow for a volume calculation to commence on the amount of coal mined.

Example #5: Highwall Coal


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The photo above shows what the coal looks like when its be excavated to the highwall. Surveyors will use lasers to pickup a string of points along the highwall coal roof which can be used in records for displaying the overall progress of coal mined and therefore future designs and geological modelling can also use this data.

Example #6: Laser scan of area in above photo


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The example above shows a laser scan of the area shown in the photo in example #5.

Example #7: Tracing highwall coal


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Above shows a graphical representation of that coal roof data you would pickup using a laser. In some cases, tracing a line on an automated scanning laser data could also be done (as shown in the example).

Open-cut Mine Surveying Duties